Metro

In the first case, a 21-year-old was duped of Rs 52,000. The victim, had responded to an advertisement on OLX regarding the sale of a two-wheeler, last year. The accused promised to send the bike by courier, after the victim deposited the said amount into his bank account. When the bike failed to arrive, the victim filed a complain at Sahakarnagar police station.

In the second case, a 28-year-old woman was duped of Rs 49,998. According to the complaint filed at Alankar police station, the victim received a call from an unidentified person, claiming to be from Amazon stating she had received an offer, to purchase a Dell laptop. The victim deposited the said amount via Paytm to the accused. Umesh Mali, assistant police inspector, Alankar police station, is investigating the case.

The third case was lodged at Kondhwa police station. The complainant, a 25-year-old was duped of Rs 7,000 by the accused who had posted an advertisement to sell his laptop on OLX. The accused asked the victim to deposit the said amount, in advance, as shipping charges . The incident took place in November 2018. Mahadeo Kumbhar, police inspector crime, Kondhwa police station, is investigating the case.

In the fourth case a twenty-four-year-old filed a complaint at Kondhwa police station, stating he has been duped of Rs 3.46 lakh. The accused had demanded the said amount in various instalments, from the victim under the pretext of completing formalities, who was looking to secure a job for his younger brother. The crime took place last year, via multiple online transactions. Anil Patil , senior police inspector, Kondhwa police station, is investigating the case.

News Source: hindustantimes

Published in Technology
Wednesday, 09 August 2017 13:08

Enrolment for Aadhaar set to resume soon

adharcard

Published in Local News

health mediIndia added 450 million people over the 25 years to 2016, a period during which the proportion of people living in poverty fell by half. This period of rising prosperity has been marked by a "dual - disease burden", a continuing rise in communicable diseases and a spurt in non - communicable or "lifestyle" diseases, which accounted for half of all deaths in 2015, up from 42 per cent in 2001-03.

The result of this disease burden on a growing and aging population, economic development and increasing health awareness is a healthcare industry that has grown to $81.3 billion (Rs 54,086 lakh crore) in 2013 and is now projected to grow at 17 per cent by 2020, up from 11 per cent in 1990.

As that happens, in rural areas, mobile technology and improved data services are expected to play a critical role in improving healthcare delivery. Although limited, some companies are also investing in innovative services and creating lucrative yet low - cost digital and device solutions, an example of which would be GE Healthcare's Lullaby Baby Warmer.

However, despite some advances, India's healthcare sector must deal with a plethora of challenges.

With the lowest government spend and public spend, as a proportion of gross domestic product (GDP), and the lowest per capita health spend China spends 5.6 times more, the US 125 times more Indmet more than 62 per cent of their health expenses from their personal savings, called "out - of - pocket expenses", compared with 13.4 per cent in the US, 10 per cent in the UK and 54 per cent in China.

India's existing infrastructure is just not enough to cater to the growing demand.

While the private sector dominates healthcare delivery across the country, a majority of the population living below the poverty line (BPL) the ability to spend Rs 47 per day in urban areas, Rs 32 per day in rural areas continues to rely on the under - financed and short staffed public sector for its healthcare needs, as a result of which these remain unmet.

Moreover, the majority of healthcare professionals happen to be concentrated around urban areas where consumers have higher paying power, leaving rural areas underserved.

India meets the global average in a number of physicians, but 74 per cent of its doctors cater to a third of the urban population, or no more than 442 million people, according to a KPMG report.

India compares unfavourably with China and the US in a number of hospital beds and nurses. The country is 81 per cent short of specialists at rural community health centres (CHCs), and the private sector accounts for 63 per cent of hospital beds, according to government health and family welfare statistics.

New source: health news

Published in Health

chimp main 1Hercules and Leo are only 11 years old, but they’ve already come close to retiring twice. The two chimpanzees, born and raised at Louisiana’s New Iberia Research Center, became lab animals at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 2011. There they shared a three-room enclosure, where scientists inserted small electrodes into their muscles to study the evolution of bipedalism. In 2013, they were the subject of an unusual legal gambit. An animal rights group sued to declare the pair legal persons and retire them to a Florida sanctuary, but the effort failed.

Two years later, Hercules and Leo returned to New Iberia, where they mingled with other chimps in outdoor domes with ladders and ropes. But retirement to a sanctuary, where they could climb real trees and have more room to roam, again seemed imminent: The U.S. government had just effectively ended invasive work on chimpanzees, and many observers expected all lab chimps to move to sanctuaries in short order. Yet today, Hercules and Leo, along with nearly 600 of their kind across the country, remain at research facilities. It’s unclear when or whether they’ll leave.

In the past 2 years, only 73 chimps have entered sanctuaries, and the slow pace has heightened tensions between the laboratory and sanctuary communities. There’s plenty of blame to go around. Labs have dragged their feet, sanctuaries haven’t expanded quickly enough, and the government itself didn’t have a concrete plan for retirement, despite setting the process in motion in the first place.

“The biomedical community has spent years defending the use of chimpanzees in research instead of figuring out how to retire them,” says Brian Hare, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, who has studied chimpanzee behavior at sanctuaries around the world. “Now we’re scrambling to do something about it.”

New source: science news

Published in Science
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